Editorials

Porn Is Not A Public Health Crisis

Porn is not a public health crisis

Through a series of increasingly staggering mental gymnastics and a working knowledge of how to pass legislation, 27 states have deliberated and are in the process of passing mandatory porn filter laws for computers sold in-state—this means that your new Mac will likely have several hoops for you to jump through in order for you to properly get your rocks off.

Whatever blocks they put in place, expect that getting past them will be a severe invasion of your personal privacy. As if that’s not fun enough, parents in Utah can now also look forward to the freedom to sue porn producers for damages if they find their kids looking at smut. Alabama representatives have proposed similar restrictions, using Utah as an example.

Porn Blocking Restrictions - Alabama

Is anyone feeling GREAT, yet?

Look. I’m not going to sit here and extol the virtues of porn—there are far too many to list in a single blog post. What I am going to do, however, is say this one thing very, very clearly, so all you yahoos in the back can hear it:

Porn is not ‘toxic’ and is not causing a ‘public health crisis’. The real public health crisis is growing levels of ignorance, apathy, and fear of the different or unknown.

I know, I know: I work for a porn company, so I’m automatically biased, right? That’s probably a bit true, and congratulations for figuring me out! You win nothing. But speaking apart from my job, and speaking as a woman in her 30s who owns more cats than pairs of pants and also maintains a healthy sex life (which includes but is not limited to porn!), I can say definitively that porn is not the problem. Allow me to elaborate.

People don’t talk to their kids. They also don’t like to take the blame for raising their children poorly, so they’ve chosen an easy punching bag that conservatives have always loved: porn. We’re seeing Reagan-era levels of puritanical panic surrounding the porn industry, and it’s got to stop. Demonizing an entire industry isn’t going to solve anything, aside from maybe temporarily assuaging people’s fears for five minutes that their precious children won’t be exposed to awful things like “the human sexual experience”.

Let me say right now that if the worst thing that ever happens to your kid is that they see some guy getting his dick sucked, you’re not doing too badly as a parent.
Sex— and exploring one’s own budding sexuality—is a necessity. Studies have shown over and over that proper sex education (none of that abstinence-only bullshit) creates less instances of teen pregnancy and lower STI rates in teens and 20-somethings.

Porn is the next logical step after ol’ fashioned book learnin’ for learning about your sexuality; it gives people the ability to explore their deepest desires in a safe setting, it allows them the freedom to watch two women share a double-ended dildo, and lets them figure out whether or not that’s something they’re into. Making us in the porn industry out to be the bad guys because some kid saw Allie Haze getting her pussy licked is the wrong way to go about this;simply pretending something doesn’t exist doesn’t make it go away, nor does it solve any problems (real or perceived).

Another argument I tend to hear from the anti-porn camp is that porn destroys lives and marriages, which I think is a tad melodramatic. They paint a picture of their good and wholesome world spiralling out of control, but they lack the necessary facts to back up their vision of terror: the rates for sex crimes and sexual assault have plunged in the past two decades which is, ironically, when adult entertainment thrived. Teen pregnancy is rarer than it’s been in half a century, and the divorce rate has dropped to a 35-year low in the US. The data shows, instead, that men who watch porn are more likely to agree with feminist principles, to have better and more fulfilling sex lives, and to possess a greater tolerance for sexual diversity. Those are all things, by the way, that conservatives tend to hate.

The legislation being passed in those 27 states is laying the groundwork for a larger attack against the adult industry’s constitutional right to free speech. When people start to make the argument that what we do is dangerous and potentially harmful, we’ll start to see any protections we value rolled back on us pretty quickly…which would mean far less porn for all of you. But I’m probably preaching to the choir here; I’m not really expecting any conservative legislators to be reading a porn blog… that would require some degree of open-mindedness, tolerance, and acceptance.
God forbid.

Alabama Representative and Blocking Porn

Above: State Rep. Jack Williams, Alabama

Read our previous editorial on Utah Gov. Gary Herbert’s strange and unhealthy obsession with porn right here.

See a related article posted by our friends at XBIZ for more from the Free Speech Coalition.

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